Clinic Canine Packages and Prices

Our Veterinary Medical Board is dedicated to compiling the best vaccine combinations to keep your dog healthy, happy and safe.

CLINIC FELINE PACKAGES

Clinic Puppy Packs

Click on the arrows below to learn more about our vaccines.

PUPPY PACK 1 - RECOMMENDED FOR DOGS 8 WEEKS OLD - $59

Puppy Pack 1 is a good place to start for most puppies, but always discuss your pet’s lifestyle with a veterinary professional before deciding on the appropriate care for your puppy. This package includes the basic canine combination vaccine (covering parvo and distemper), a standard dewormer, and a fecal test to screen for various internal parasites. Keep your puppy indoors and separated from other dogs as much as possible throughout the course of the Puppy Series.

5 in 1 (DAP + Parvo) Vaccine

5-in-1 is also known as DA2PP or DHPP vaccine – and protects against:

• Distemper virus (causes Canine Distemper)
Canine distemper is a highly contagious and often fatal viral disease. It is found worldwide in places inhabited by dogs and other members of the canine family. The virus is spread in the air and via direct contact through respiratory secretions of an infected dog or wild animal. Distemper primarily affects puppies and younger dogs, but can infect and be potentially fatal in dogs of any age. The disease attacks primarily the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems (brain and spinal cord) but can affect every organ system of the body. It may cause vomiting, diarrhea, pneumonia, and severe brain damage. Canine distemper is so widespread that nearly every dog is exposed during its lifetime. This disease is not transmissible to humans or cats. Canine distemper’s high fatality rate makes vaccination essential.

• Adenovirus 1 (causes Infectious Canine Hepatitis) and Adenovirus 2 (one cause of Infectious Tracheobronchitis, AKA “kennel cough”)
Canine adenovirus infection comes in two forms – Type-1 causes severe (even fatal) liver disease; Type-2 causes respiratory disease which can lead to pneumonia and death. These viruses are very contagious. Dogs of any age can become infected with canine adenovirus via contact with infected saliva, mucus, urine, or feces. Neither form of canine adenovirus is transmissible to humans or cats.

• Parainfluenza (another cause of Infectious Tracheobronchitis, AKA “kennel cough”)
Canine parainfluenza virus is one of the most common causes of infectious tracheobronchitis, also called “kennel cough”, an infection of the windpipe (trachea) and its lower branches (the bronchi). Other important organisms can also cause kennel cough, such as canine adenovirus-2 and Bordetella bronchiseptica, a bacterial pathogen. Kennel cough is characterized by a dry, persistent cough which can last for weeks to several months even with treatment. The disease is extremely contagious from dog to dog. It can lead to pneumonia and death. The disease does not affect humans or cats.

• Parvovirus (causes Canine Parvo)
Parvovirus is a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease of puppies and unvaccinated adult dogs. This virus is transmitted by direct contact with infected dogs or wild members of the dog family, infected feces, or a contaminated environment. Canine parvovirus can live for months to years in the environment. Canine parvovirus causes fever, severe vomiting, diarrhea (often -but not always- containing blood), and dehydration in dogs. The disease is often fatal. The virus is especially lethal to young dogs. It is transmitted by contact with parvovirus-infected dog feces or with an object which has come into contact with infected dog feces.

The virus may be brought into a home on a person’s hand, clothes, or shoes. Therefore, even a strictly indoor dog with no direct contact with other dogs, should be vaccinated against parvovirus. This disease does not affect people or cats.

NOTE: Certain breeds of dogs are especially susceptible to parvovirus infection. These breeds include rottweilers, doberman pinschers, pit bull breeds, and German shepherds. We recommend that puppies of such breeds be given an extra parvovirus vaccination at 20 – 22 weeks-of-age. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds who are to be boarded at a kennel may benefit from an additional parvovirus vaccination just prior (a few days to a few weeks) to boarding. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds that go to dog shows, dog classes, dog parks, or visit any location which dogs have frequented may benefit from receiving a parvovirus vaccination every six months rather than just annually.

Roundworm/Hookworm Dewormer

The most common source of puppy roundworms are roundworm larvae (immature roundworms) which are resting and causing no trouble in the wall of the mother’s uterus. These larvae migrate into the fetal pups during pregnancy. The larvae then mature in the young pup and start laying eggs when the puppy is about three weeks of age. From that time on, the affected puppy’s feces contain eggs and can transmit roundworms to other dogs as well as re-infecting itself. Roundworm may be detected, treated, and prevented by VIP Petcare.

Fecal Test

A fecal test is an intestinal parasite screening; it tests for many different types of intestinal parasites including the most common parasites, Coccidia, Giardia, Whipworm, Hookworm and Roundworm.

We use Antech Laboratories for all our testing; the Zinc Sulfate Centrifugation method is used for fecal testing. We get the results back 2-3 business days after submission of the sample. Results are sent by email (if available) and postal mail. Positive results will be followed up with by phone from an automated phone call.

Fecal collection submission instructions:
• Collect your pet’s sample the day you intend to drop it off at one of our scheduled clinics. The fresher the sample is at the time of submission, the more accurate the results will be.
• The sample should be no more than 12 hours old, and the tube should be filled at least half-way. We recommend keeping the sample refrigerated until you leave for the clinic, and using latex gloves while collecting the sample (rather than bare hands).
• Check our clinic schedule to ensure that we will be on-site when you arrive, and drop off the sample with any clinic staff member – no need to wait in line.
• If you provided an email address, your pet’s test results will be emailed to you as soon as they are available. All results are posted within 5 days of submission. If you did not provide an email address, you will receive mailed results within 2 weeks of submission.
• If your pet’s sample tests positive for any intestinal parasites, HelpDesk will contact you by phone within one week of submission to discuss treatment options.
• Another fecal test is recommended 8-10 days after treatment for pets who test positive for parasites.

Add Canine Rabies if older than minimum age (optional) ($10)

Vaccination of dogs against the rabies virus is required by law in nearly every state. Even where it is not required by state law, most cities and counties have passed their own rabies vaccine requirements. Vaccination of puppies should begin at the minimum age as determined by each state. An annual booster vaccination should be given after the first vaccination. After the second vaccination, every subsequent vaccine has an efficacy of three years.

Price: $59

PUPPY PACK 2 - RECOMMENDED FOR DOGS 12 WEEKS OLD - $67

In a perfect world nearly every puppy would get Puppy Pack 2 at 12 weeks of age, 4 weeks after Puppy Pack 1, then followed by Puppy Pack 3 at 16 weeks of age.

This package is similar to Puppy Pack 1 but it includes coverage for Leptospirosis and Bordetella. Discuss your puppy’s lifestyle with a veterinary professional before deciding on the appropriate care.

5 in 1 (DAP + Parvo) Vaccine

5-in-1 is also known as DA2PP or DHPP vaccine – and protects against:

• Distemper virus (causes Canine Distemper)
Canine distemper is a highly contagious and often fatal viral disease. It is found worldwide in places inhabited by dogs and other members of the canine family. The virus is spread in the air and via direct contact through respiratory secretions of an infected dog or wild animal. Distemper primarily affects puppies and younger dogs, but can infect and be potentially fatal in dogs of any age. The disease attacks primarily the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems (brain and spinal cord) but can affect every organ system of the body. It may cause vomiting, diarrhea, pneumonia, and severe brain damage. Canine distemper is so widespread that nearly every dog is exposed during its lifetime. This disease is not transmissible to humans or cats. Canine distemper’s high fatality rate makes vaccination essential.

• Adenovirus 1 (causes Infectious Canine Hepatitis) and Adenovirus 2 (one cause of Infectious Tracheobronchitis, AKA “kennel cough”)
Canine adenovirus infection comes in two forms – Type-1 causes severe (even fatal) liver disease; Type-2 causes respiratory disease which can lead to pneumonia and death. These viruses are very contagious. Dogs of any age can become infected with canine adenovirus via contact with infected saliva, mucus, urine, or feces. Neither form of canine adenovirus is transmissible to humans or cats.

• Parainfluenza (another cause of Infectious Tracheobronchitis, AKA “kennel cough”)
Canine parainfluenza virus is one of the most common causes of infectious tracheobronchitis, also called “kennel cough”, an infection of the windpipe (trachea) and its lower branches (the bronchi). Other important organisms can also cause kennel cough, such as canine adenovirus-2 and Bordetella bronchiseptica, a bacterial pathogen. Kennel cough is characterized by a dry, persistent cough which can last for weeks to several months even with treatment. The disease is extremely contagious from dog to dog. It can lead to pneumonia and death. The disease does not affect humans or cats.

• Parvovirus (causes Canine Parvo)
Parvovirus is a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease of puppies and unvaccinated adult dogs. This virus is transmitted by direct contact with infected dogs or wild members of the dog family, infected feces, or a contaminated environment. Canine parvovirus can live for months to years in the environment. Canine parvovirus causes fever, severe vomiting, diarrhea (often -but not always- containing blood), and dehydration in dogs. The disease is often fatal. The virus is especially lethal to young dogs. It is transmitted by contact with parvovirus-infected dog feces or with an object which has come into contact with infected dog feces.

The virus may be brought into a home on a person’s hand, clothes, or shoes. Therefore, even a strictly indoor dog with no direct contact with other dogs, should be vaccinated against parvovirus. This disease does not affect people or cats.

NOTE: Certain breeds of dogs are especially susceptible to parvovirus infection. These breeds include rottweilers, doberman pinschers, pit bull breeds, and German shepherds. We recommend that puppies of such breeds be given an extra parvovirus vaccination at 20 – 22 weeks-of-age. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds who are to be boarded at a kennel may benefit from an additional parvovirus vaccination just prior (a few days to a few weeks) to boarding. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds that go to dog shows, dog classes, dog parks, or visit any location which dogs have frequented may benefit from receiving a parvovirus vaccination every six months rather than just annually.

Leptospirosis 4-wayLeptospirosis is a bacterial infection often causing permanent kidney and liver damage in dogs. It is a bacterial disease which attacks the kidneys and the liver, causing uremia (uremic poisoning), jaundice, and sometimes death.

The disease is highly contagious and often fatal. It is transmitted by many species of wild and domestic animals, including rats. Both dogs and humans contract this disease through contact with infected animals or through leptospira-contaminated drinking water.

Roundworm/Hookworm Dewormer

The most common source of puppy roundworms are roundworm larvae (immature roundworms) which are resting and causing no trouble in the wall of the mother’s uterus. These larvae migrate into the fetal pups during pregnancy. The larvae then mature in the young pup and start laying eggs when the puppy is about three weeks of age. From that time on, the affected puppy’s feces contain eggs and can transmit roundworms to other dogs as well as re-infecting itself. Roundworm may be detected, treated, and prevented by VIP Petcare.

Bordetella – Intranasal vaccine

Bordetella bronchisepticum, a bacterial pathogen, is one of the several major causes of infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB, more commonly known as kennel cough), an extremely contagious respiratory disease of dogs. If treated, ITB rarely causes death, but even with treatment, the disease typically lasts for many weeks, during which time the affected dog is extremely contagious to other dogs. The disease is spread by direct contact and via airborne transmission. Bordetella is characterized by a dry, hacking, and often painful cough. Bordetella does not affect people or cats.

“Kennel cough” can be caused by many different bacterial and viral pathogens, the most common of which are Bordetella bronchisepticum (a bacterium), canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus 2. The disease is most common in dogs in close contact with infected dogs (e.g. in kennels, shelters, puppy classes, groomers, and working dog environments). However, cases can occasionally appear in dogs confined to a house or yard, as the disease is occasionally transmitted dog-to-dog through a fence or screen door.

Add Fecal Test ($10)

A fecal test is an intestinal parasite screening; it tests for many different types of intestinal parasites including the most common parasites, Coccidia, Giardia, Whipworm, Hookworm and Roundworm.

We use Antech Laboratories for all our testing; the Zinc Sulfate Centrifugation method is used for fecal testing. We get the results back 2-3 business days after submission of the sample. Results are sent by email (if available) and postal mail. Positive results will be followed up with by phone from an automated phone call.

Add Canine Rabies if older than minimum age (optional) ($10)

Vaccination of dogs against the rabies virus is required by law in nearly every state. Even where it is not required by state law, most cities and counties have passed their own rabies vaccine requirements. Vaccination of puppies should begin at the minimum age as determined by each state. An annual booster vaccination should be given after the first vaccination. After the second vaccination, every subsequent vaccine has an efficacy of three years.

Price: $67

PUPPY PACK 3 - RECOMMENDED FOR DOGS 16 WEEKS OLD - $67

This is often the final package for puppies and will generally take place at 16 weeks of age. If your puppy has received sufficient boosters for their Puppy Series, then future vaccinations should take place annually, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

If your puppy has received all three puppy packs but is less than 16 weeks of age, VIP Petcare recommends one final 5in1 vaccine in 3-4 weeks. Rabies vaccines do not require a 3-4 week booster after the first vaccination and only need to be done once during the Puppy Series.

5 in 1 (DAP + Parvo) Vaccine

5-in-1 is also known as DA2PP or DHPP vaccine – and protects against:

• Distemper virus (causes Canine Distemper)
Canine distemper is a highly contagious and often fatal viral disease. It is found worldwide in places inhabited by dogs and other members of the canine family. The virus is spread in the air and via direct contact through respiratory secretions of an infected dog or wild animal. Distemper primarily affects puppies and younger dogs, but can infect and be potentially fatal in dogs of any age. The disease attacks primarily the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems (brain and spinal cord) but can affect every organ system of the body. It may cause vomiting, diarrhea, pneumonia, and severe brain damage. Canine distemper is so widespread that nearly every dog is exposed during its lifetime. This disease is not transmissible to humans or cats. Canine distemper’s high fatality rate makes vaccination essential.

• Adenovirus 1 (causes Infectious Canine Hepatitis) and Adenovirus 2 (one cause of Infectious Tracheobronchitis, AKA “kennel cough”)
Canine adenovirus infection comes in two forms – Type-1 causes severe (even fatal) liver disease; Type-2 causes respiratory disease which can lead to pneumonia and death. These viruses are very contagious. Dogs of any age can become infected with canine adenovirus via contact with infected saliva, mucus, urine, or feces. Neither form of canine adenovirus is transmissible to humans or cats.

• Parainfluenza (another cause of Infectious Tracheobronchitis, AKA “kennel cough”)
Canine parainfluenza virus is one of the most common causes of infectious tracheobronchitis, also called “kennel cough”, an infection of the windpipe (trachea) and its lower branches (the bronchi). Other important organisms can also cause kennel cough, such as canine adenovirus-2 and Bordetella bronchiseptica, a bacterial pathogen. Kennel cough is characterized by a dry, persistent cough which can last for weeks to several months even with treatment. The disease is extremely contagious from dog to dog. It can lead to pneumonia and death. The disease does not affect humans or cats.

• Parvovirus (causes Canine Parvo)
Parvovirus is a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease of puppies and unvaccinated adult dogs. This virus is transmitted by direct contact with infected dogs or wild members of the dog family, infected feces, or a contaminated environment. Canine parvovirus can live for months to years in the environment. Canine parvovirus causes fever, severe vomiting, diarrhea (often -but not always- containing blood), and dehydration in dogs. The disease is often fatal. The virus is especially lethal to young dogs. It is transmitted by contact with parvovirus-infected dog feces or with an object which has come into contact with infected dog feces.

The virus may be brought into a home on a person’s hand, clothes, or shoes. Therefore, even a strictly indoor dog with no direct contact with other dogs, should be vaccinated against parvovirus. This disease does not affect people or cats.

NOTE: Certain breeds of dogs are especially susceptible to parvovirus infection. These breeds include rottweilers, doberman pinschers, pit bull breeds, and German shepherds. We recommend that puppies of such breeds be given an extra parvovirus vaccination at 20 – 22 weeks-of-age. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds who are to be boarded at a kennel may benefit from an additional parvovirus vaccination just prior (a few days to a few weeks) to boarding. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds that go to dog shows, dog classes, dog parks, or visit any location which dogs have frequented may benefit from receiving a parvovirus vaccination every six months rather than just annually.

Leptospirosis 4-way

Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection often causing permanent kidney and liver damage in dogs. It is a bacterial disease which attacks the kidneys and the liver, causing uremia (uremic poisoning), jaundice, and sometimes death.

The disease is highly contagious and often fatal. It is transmitted by many species of wild and domestic animals, including rats. Both dogs and humans contract this disease through contact with infected animals or through leptospira-contaminated drinking water.

Roundworm/Hookworm Dewormer

The most common source of puppy roundworms are roundworm larvae (immature roundworms) which are resting and causing no trouble in the wall of the mother’s uterus. These larvae migrate into the fetal pups during pregnancy. The larvae then mature in the young pup and start laying eggs when the puppy is about three weeks of age. From that time on, the affected puppy’s feces contain eggs and can transmit roundworms to other dogs as well as re-infecting itself. Roundworm may be detected, treated, and prevented by VIP Petcare.

Bordetella Vaccine

ordetella bronchisepticum, a bacterial pathogen, is one of the several major causes of infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB, more commonly known as kennel cough), an extremely contagious respiratory disease of dogs. If treated, ITB rarely causes death, but even with treatment, the disease typically lasts for many weeks, during which time the affected dog is extremely contagious to other dogs. The disease is spread by direct contact and via airborne transmission. Bordetella is characterized by a dry, hacking, and often painful cough. Bordetella does not affect people or cats.

“Kennel cough” can be caused by many different bacterial and viral pathogens, the most common of which are Bordetella bronchisepticum (a bacterium), canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus 2. The disease is most common in dogs in close contact with infected dogs (e.g. in kennels, shelters, puppy classes, groomers, and working dog environments). However, cases can occasionally appear in dogs confined to a house or yard, as the disease is occasionally transmitted dog-to-dog through a fence or screen door.

Add fecal test ($10)

A fecal test is an intestinal parasite screening; it tests for many different types of intestinal parasites including the most common parasites, Coccidia, Giardia, Whipworm, Hookworm and Roundworm.

We use Antech Laboratories for all our testing; the Zinc Sulfate Centrifugation method is used for fecal testing. We get the results back 2-3 business days after submission of the sample. Results are sent by email (if available) and postal mail. Positive results will be followed up with by phone from an automated phone call.

Add Canine Rabies if older than minimum age (optional) ($10)

Vaccination of dogs against the rabies virus is required by law in nearly every state. Even where it is not required by state law, most cities and counties have passed their own rabies vaccine requirements. Vaccination of puppies should begin at the minimum age as determined by each state. An annual booster vaccination should be given after the first vaccination. After the second vaccination, every subsequent vaccine has an efficacy of three years.

Price: $67

CANINE INFLUENZA PACK - RECOMMENDED FOR DOGS 8 WEEKS OLD AND OLDER - $39

H3N8 and H3N2 Vaccine

This vaccine pack provides comprehensive coverage against two strains of the Canine Influenza Virus – H3N8 and H3N2.

Canine Influenza Virus is a highly contagious respiratory infection commonly seen in socially active dogs. Outbreaks are commonly seen in situations where dogs are in close contact, such as shelters, kennels, dog day care facilities, and grooming or boarding facilities.The first outbreak of H3N8 was in 2004, and has since been seen all over the US. The first positive case of H3N2 was in March, 2015 in Chicago and has spread to a number of other areas throughout the US. Both strains are still being diagnosed around the country, and all dogs are at risk. Symptoms include red and/or runny eyes, fever, sneezing, nasal discharge, dry, persistent cough, drastic weight loss, physical discomfort.

Two doses are required 3-4 weeks apart, and can begin as early as 8 weeks of age. An annual booster vaccination may be given for life, or as recommended by your veterinarian.This disease is most common in densely populated canine communities and amongst dogs that are constantly in public places. Speak with a veterinary professional before deciding if this vaccine is appropriate for your dog. Minimum age of 8 weeks.

Price: $39

Clinic Dog Pack

For more information on what our vaccines protect against, visit our Parasite Prevention and Detection page.

ADULT DOG PACK - $74

Adult dogs need regular vaccinations to ensure they keep adequate antibodies to fight off common diseases. Most dog vaccines are generally recommended to be done annually, but speak with a veterinary professional before deciding on the appropriate care for your adult dog.

Typically rabies vaccinations for dogs have 3 year efficacy. VIP Petcare strongly recommends annual fecal testing for all dogs.

If you have an adult dog with no vaccination history, the VIP Petcare veterinarian will likely recommend booster vaccines 3-4 weeks after administration of the initial Adult Dog Pack.

5 in 1 (DAP + Parvo) Vaccine

5-in-1 is also known as DA2PP or DHPP vaccine – and protects against:

• Distemper virus (causes Canine Distemper)
Canine distemper is a highly contagious and often fatal viral disease. It is found worldwide in places inhabited by dogs and other members of the canine family. The virus is spread in the air and via direct contact through respiratory secretions of an infected dog or wild animal. Distemper primarily affects puppies and younger dogs, but can infect and be potentially fatal in dogs of any age. The disease attacks primarily the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems (brain and spinal cord) but can affect every organ system of the body. It may cause vomiting, diarrhea, pneumonia, and severe brain damage. Canine distemper is so widespread that nearly every dog is exposed during its lifetime. This disease is not transmissible to humans or cats. Canine distemper’s high fatality rate makes vaccination essential.

• Adenovirus 1 (causes Infectious Canine Hepatitis) and Adenovirus 2 (one cause of Infectious Tracheobronchitis, AKA “kennel cough”)
Canine adenovirus infection comes in two forms – Type-1 causes severe (even fatal) liver disease; Type-2 causes respiratory disease which can lead to pneumonia and death. These viruses are very contagious. Dogs of any age can become infected with canine adenovirus via contact with infected saliva, mucus, urine, or feces. Neither form of canine adenovirus is transmissible to humans or cats.

• Parainfluenza (another cause of Infectious Tracheobronchitis, AKA “kennel cough”)
Canine parainfluenza virus is one of the most common causes of infectious tracheobronchitis, also called “kennel cough”, an infection of the windpipe (trachea) and its lower branches (the bronchi). Other important organisms can also cause kennel cough, such as canine adenovirus-2 and Bordetella bronchiseptica, a bacterial pathogen. Kennel cough is characterized by a dry, persistent cough which can last for weeks to several months even with treatment. The disease is extremely contagious from dog to dog. It can lead to pneumonia and death. The disease does not affect humans or cats.

• Parvovirus (causes Canine Parvo)
Parvovirus is a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease of puppies and unvaccinated adult dogs. This virus is transmitted by direct contact with infected dogs or wild members of the dog family, infected feces, or a contaminated environment. Canine parvovirus can live for months to years in the environment. Canine parvovirus causes fever, severe vomiting, diarrhea (often -but not always- containing blood), and dehydration in dogs. The disease is often fatal. The virus is especially lethal to young dogs. It is transmitted by contact with parvovirus-infected dog feces or with an object which has come into contact with infected dog feces.

The virus may be brought into a home on a person’s hand, clothes, or shoes. Therefore, even a strictly indoor dog with no direct contact with other dogs, should be vaccinated against parvovirus. This disease does not affect people or cats.

NOTE: Certain breeds of dogs are especially susceptible to parvovirus infection. These breeds include rottweilers, doberman pinschers, pit bull breeds, and German shepherds. We recommend that puppies of such breeds be given an extra parvovirus vaccination at 20 – 22 weeks-of-age. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds who are to be boarded at a kennel may benefit from an additional parvovirus vaccination just prior (a few days to a few weeks) to boarding. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds that go to dog shows, dog classes, dog parks, or visit any location which dogs have frequented may benefit from receiving a parvovirus vaccination every six months rather than just annually.

Leptospirosis 4-way

Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection often causing permanent kidney and liver damage in dogs. It is a bacterial disease which attacks the kidneys and the liver, causing uremia (uremic poisoning), jaundice, and sometimes death.

The disease is highly contagious and often fatal. It is transmitted by many species of wild and domestic animals, including rats. Both dogs and humans contract this disease through contact with infected animals or through leptospira-contaminated drinking water.

Bordetella

Bordetella bronchisepticum, a bacterial pathogen, is one of the several major causes of infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB, more commonly known as kennel cough), an extremely contagious respiratory disease of dogs. If treated, ITB rarely causes death, but even with treatment, the disease typically lasts for many weeks, during which time the affected dog is extremely contagious to other dogs. The disease is spread by direct contact and via airborne transmission. Bordetella is characterized by a dry, hacking, and often painful cough. Bordetella does not affect people or cats.

“Kennel cough” can be caused by many different bacterial and viral pathogens, the most common of which are Bordetella bronchisepticum (a bacterium), canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus 2. The disease is most common in dogs in close contact with infected dogs (e.g. in kennels, shelters, puppy classes, groomers, and working dog environments). However, cases can occasionally appear in dogs confined to a house or yard, as the disease is occasionally transmitted dog-to-dog through a fence or screen door.

Fecal Test

A fecal test is an intestinal parasite screening; it tests for many different types of intestinal parasites including the most common parasites, Coccidia, Giardia, Whipworm, Hookworm and Roundworm.

We use Antech Laboratories for all our testing; the Zinc Sulfate Centrifugation method is used for fecal testing. We get the results back 2-3 business days after submission of the sample. Results are sent by email (if available) and postal mail. Positive results will be followed up with by phone from an automated phone call.

Fecal collection submission instructions:
• Collect your pet’s sample the day you intend to drop it off at one of our scheduled clinics. The fresher the sample is at the time of submission, the more accurate the results will be.
• The sample should be no more than 12 hours old, and the tube should be filled at least half-way. We recommend keeping the sample refrigerated until you leave for the clinic, and using latex gloves while collecting the sample (rather than bare hands).
• Check our clinic schedule to ensure that we will be on-site when you arrive, and drop off the sample with any clinic staff member – no need to wait in line.
• If you provided an email address, your pet’s test results will be emailed to you as soon as they are available. All results are posted within 5 days of submission. If you did not provide an email address, you will receive mailed results within 2 weeks of submission.
• If your pet’s sample tests positive for any intestinal parasites, HelpDesk will contact you by phone within one week of submission to discuss treatment options.
• Another fecal test is recommended 8-10 days after treatment for pets who test positive for parasites.

Add Canine Rabies if older than minimum age (optional) ($10)

Vaccination of dogs against the rabies virus is required by law in nearly every state. Even where it is not required by state law, most cities and counties have passed their own rabies vaccine requirements. Vaccination of puppies should begin at the minimum age as determined by each state. An annual booster vaccination should be given after the first vaccination. After the second vaccination, every subsequent vaccine has an efficacy of three years.

Price: $74