Wellness Center Individual Vaccine Pricing

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Canine: Individual Vaccines

Vaccine

Disease & Detection

Recommendation & Pricing

RABIES

Vaccination of dogs against the rabies virus is required by law in nearly every state. Even where it is not required by state law, most cities and counties have passed their own rabies vaccine requirements. Rabies vaccination of cats is not always required by law, but all cats should still be vaccinated.

In most areas of the United States pet owners are required to license their pets with a City or County Animal Control Facility. In nearly all cases, a current rabies vaccination is required before you can license your pet. In some cases a microchip is required as well. Often dogs are the only pets that require a license, but in many places it is required for cats as well. Check with your local animal control facility for more information. VIP Petcare provides proof of vaccination with every rabies vaccine given, this proof can be used to procure a license.

Rabies is a viral infection of the central nervous system that can affect all mammals, including humans, and is 100% fatal if left untreated. It is transmitted from animal-to-animal or from animal-to-human primarily through the bite of an infected animal. Rabies virus travels in the nerves from the site of the bite to the brain and spinal cord. Rabies is ever present in the U.S. in wild animals such as skunks, raccoons, and bats.

Rabid animals undergo personality changes during the course of the disease; these changes may include aggression and biting or, conversely, increased friendliness and affectionateness. Other symptoms may include fever, seizures, paralysis, hydrophobia (fear of water), lack of coordination, excessive excitability, and excessive salivation or foaming at the mouth. Once clinical signs of rabies appear, treatment is not effective and the disease is fatal.

If your pet shows any of the common symptoms of rabies as described above, get them to a full-service veterinary facility immediately. If treatment is not pursued immediately, the prognosis for most pets is very poor.

Recommended protocol:
Vaccination of puppies should begin at the minimum age as determined by each state. Booster the first vaccine after 1 year, then every 3 years after that.

Recommended lifestyle:
All dogs from 12-16 weeks (minimum age for rabies is determined by state law, varies throughout the U.S.)

Price: $25

5-IN-1 (DA2P + PARVOVIRUS) VACCINE

5-in-1 is also known as DA2PP or DHPP vaccine – protection against:

• Distemper virus (causes Canine Distemper)
• Adenovirus 1 (causes Infectious Canine Hepatitis)
• Adenovirus 2 (one cause of Infectious Tracheobronchitis, or “kennel cough”)
• Parainfluenza (another cause of Infectious Tracheobronchitis, or “kennel cough”)
• Parvovirus (causes Canine Parvo)

Canine Distemper
Canine distemper is a highly contagious and often fatal viral disease. It is found worldwide in places inhabited by dogs and other members of the canine family. The virus is spread in the air and via direct contact through respiratory secretions of an infected dog or wild animal. Distemper primarily affects puppies and younger dogs, but can infect and be potentially fatal in dogs of any age. The disease attacks primarily the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems (brain and spinal cord) but can affect every organ system of the body. It may cause vomiting, diarrhea, pneumonia, and severe brain damage. Canine distemper is so widespread that nearly every dog is exposed during its lifetime. This disease is not transmissible to humans or cats. Canine distemper’s high fatality rate makes vaccination essential.

Adenovirus 1, Adenovirus 2 (AKA Canine Hepatitis)
Canine adenovirus infection comes in two forms – Type-1 causes severe (even fatal) liver disease; Type-2 causes respiratory disease which can lead to pneumonia and death. These viruses are very contagious. Dogs of any age can become infected with canine adenovirus via contact with infected saliva, mucus, urine, or feces. Neither form of canine adenovirus is transmissible to humans or cats.

Parainfluenza Virus
Canine parainfluenza virus is one of the most common causes of infectious tracheobronchitis, also called “kennel cough”, an infection of the windpipe (trachea) and its lower branches (the bronchi). Other important organisms can also cause kennel cough, such as canine adenovirus-2 and Bordetella bronchiseptica, a bacterial pathogen. Kennel cough is characterized by a dry, persistent cough which can last for weeks to several months even with treatment. The disease is extremely contagious from dog to dog. It can lead to pneumonia and death. The disease does not affect humans or cats.

Parvovirus
Parvovirus is a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease of puppies and unvaccinated adult dogs. This virus is transmitted by direct contact with infected dogs or wild members of the dog family, infected feces, or a contaminated environment. Canine parvovirus can live for months to years in the environment. Canine parvovirus causes fever, severe vomiting, diarrhea (often -but not always- containing blood), and dehydration in dogs. The disease is often fatal, and is especially lethal to young dogs. It is transmitted by contact with parvovirus-infected dog feces or with an object which has come into contact with infected dog feces.

The virus may be brought into a home on a person’s hand, clothes, or shoes. Therefore, even a strictly indoor dog with no direct contact with other dogs, should be vaccinated against parvovirus. This disease does not affect people or cats.

NOTE: Certain breeds of dogs are especially susceptible to parvovirus infection. These breeds include rottweilers, doberman pinschers, pit bull breeds, and German shepherds. We recommend that puppies of such breeds be given an extra parvovirus vaccination at 20 – 22 weeks-of-age. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds who are to be boarded at a kennel may benefit from an additional parvovirus vaccination just prior (a few days to a few weeks) to boarding. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds that go to dog shows, dog classes, dog parks, or visit any location which dogs have frequented may benefit from receiving a parvovirus vaccination every six months rather than just annually.

Recommended protocol:
Vaccination of puppies should begin at 8 weeks of age and be repeated every 3 to 4 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Dogs over 4 months old will require only 1 booster vaccination 3-4 weeks after the initial vaccine. An annual booster vaccination should be given for life, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

Recommended Lifestyle:
All dogs. Minimum age of 8 weeks.

Price: $36

BORDETELLA

For protection against Kennel Cough.

Bordetella bronchisepticum, a bacterial pathogen, is one of the several major causes of infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB, more commonly known as kennel cough), an extremely contagious respiratory disease of dogs. If treated, ITB rarely causes death, but even with treatment, the disease typically lasts for many weeks, during which time the affected dog is extremely contagious to other dogs. The disease is spread by direct contact and via airborne transmission. Bordetella is characterized by a dry, hacking, and often painful cough. Bordetella does not affect people or cats.

“Kennel cough” can be caused by many different bacterial and viral pathogens, the most common of which are Bordetella bronchisepticum (a bacterium), canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus 2. The disease is most common in dogs in close contact with infected dogs (e.g. in kennels, shelters, puppy classes, groomers, and working dog environments). However, cases can occasionally appear in dogs confined to a house or yard, as the disease is occasionally transmitted dog-to-dog through a fence or screen door.

There is no currently available test for Bordetella through VIP Petcare. Symptoms, however, are often easy to spot, and generally are characterized by a dry, hacking cough. If you feel that your dog may have a Bordetella infection, make an appointment to see a full-service veterinarian immediately.

Recommended protocol:
The Bordetella vaccine should be given to all puppies 8-12 weeks of age, with subsequent boosters every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age. VIP Petcare recommends that the first vaccine be in an intranasal form (for local immunity within the upper respiratory system), and all future boosters be injectable (subcutaneous, for systemic immunity). Boosters should be given annually, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

Recommended lifestyle:
All dogs. Minimum age of 8 weeks.

Price: $36

LEPTOSPIROSIS
For protection against uremia (uremic poisoning) and jaundice.

Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection often causing permanent kidney and liver damage in dogs. It is a bacterial disease which attacks the kidneys and the liver, causing uremia (uremic poisoning), jaundice, and sometimes death.

The disease is highly contagious and often fatal. It is transmitted by many species of wild and domestic animals, including rats. Both dogs and humans contract this disease through contact with infected animals or through leptospira-contaminated drinking water.

There is no currently available test for Leptospirosis through VIP Petcare. If your dog shows any of the symptoms described above, please take them to a full service veterinary facility immediately for a diagnosis.

Recommended protocol:
VIP Petcare recommends vaccination of puppies to begin at 12 weeks-of-age and be repeated every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks-of-age. An annual booster vaccination should be given for life, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

Recommended lifestyle:
All dogs. Minimum age of 6 weeks.

Price: $36

LYME

Also known as borreliosis.
Symptoms of Lyme disease include lameness, fever, swollen lymph nodes and joints, and reduced appetite.

Also known as borreliosis, Lyme disease is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Some species of ticks carry these bacteria and transmit the disease while feeding on a new host animal’s blood. The tick must be attached to the dog for about 48 hours in order to transmit the bacteria. Symptoms of Lyme disease include lameness, fever, swollen lymph nodes and joints, and reduced appetite. Animals do not develop the typical “lyme disease rash” that is present in most human cases.

Heartworm-Lyme Combo Test
The Heartworm-Lyme Combo test is a blood screening for Heartworm disease, Lyme disease, Ehrlichiosis, and Anaplasmosis. A VIP Petcare representative will draw a small amount of blood from your dog and submit it to a national laboratory within 1-2 days.

You will receive your test results, as well as recommendations for follow up care (if needed) within the week following the blood draw. VIP Petcare recommends the Heartworm-Lyme Combo test over the Heartworm-only test for more comprehensive disease and infection screening.

Heartworm disease can be prevented with a monthly heartworm prevention product, like Heartgard or Trifexis. While there is no full-proof method of preventing Lyme disease, Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis, these can be discouraged by keeping your pet on a regular anti-tick preventative, such as NexGard.

Recommended protocol:
Vaccination of puppies may begin at 12 weeks-of-age and be repeated once 3-4 weeks later. An annual booster vaccination may be given for life, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

Recommended lifestyle:
This vaccine can be useful for dogs that are at risk of exposure to Lyme disease. Discuss your dog’s lifestyle with a veterinary professional before selecting this vaccine for your pet. Minimum age of 12 weeks.

Price: $36

h3n2 canine influenza

This vaccine provides comprehensive coverage against the Canine Influenza Virus H3N2.

Canine Influenza Virus is a highly contagious respiratory infection commonly seen in socially active dogs. Outbreaks are commonly seen in situations where dogs are in close contact, such as shelters, kennels, dog day care facilities, and grooming or boarding facilities.The first outbreak of H3N8 was in 2004, and has since been seen all over the US. The first positive case of H3N2 was in March, 2015 in Chicago and has spread to a number of other areas throughout the US. Both strains are still being diagnosed around the country, and all dogs are at risk. Symptoms include red and/or runny eyes, fever, sneezing, nasal discharge, dry, persistent cough, drastic weight loss, physical discomfort.

Recommended protocol:
Two doses are required 3-4 weeks apart, and can begin as early as 8 weeks of age. An annual booster vaccination may be given for life, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

Recommended lifestyle:
This disease is most common in densely populated canine communities and amongst dogs that are constantly in public places. Speak with a veterinary professional before deciding if this vaccine is appropriate for your dog. Minimum age of 8 weeks.

Price: $36

RATTLESNAKE VACCINE
This vaccine stimulates your dog’s own immunity. Protective antibodies, generated by your dog’s immune system in response to the vaccine, start neutralizing venom immediately. On average, antibody levels in recently vaccinated dogs are comparable to treatment with three vials of antivenom. This means vaccinated dogs should experience less pain and a reduced risk of permanent injury from a rattlesnake bite.

A rattlesnake bite is always an emergency. The rattlesnake vaccination does not neutralize 100 percent of the venom.

Your dog still needs to be taken to the veterinarian immediately after any snake bite. Even bites by non-venomous snakes can lead to serious infections and antibiotic treatment may be needed. A veterinarian can determine if your dog is sufficiently protected for the specific type of snake involved and the amount of venom injected, or whether additional medical treatment is necessary.
Vaccination may reduce the overall effects of a snake bite, reduce or eliminate the need for antivenom, and increase the chances of survival for your dog.

Rattlesnakes live in a variety of habitats, they are found in wetlands, deserts and forests, from sea level to mountain elevations. Rattlesnakes are most active in warmer seasons, from Spring to Autumn.

Dogs may be at risk for a rattlesnake bite if they live or travel in or around a natural rattlesnake habitat. Rattlesnakes may be encountered while hiking, camping, or hunting.

Like people, dogs may stumble over the location of a snake by accident. Curiosity or a protective instinct can place your dog at risk.

Damage caused by a rattlesnake bite could be serious and even fatal. When injected into an unprotected dog, the toxic components of snake venom are very painful and can have serious consequences. If your dog survives the immediate effects of a rattlesnake bite, permanent injury may follow.

If your dog or cat shows any symptoms of having experienced a rattlesnake bite, get them to a full-service emergency veterinary hospital immediately. While vaccinated dogs will have greater resistance to rattlesnake venom, they too must be rushed to a veterinary facility immediately.

Recommended protocol:
Booster recommendations are based on age, weight and exposure. Click here to download the rattlesnake brochure for more information.

Recommended lifestyle:
Only for dogs exposed to rattlesnakes. Discuss your pet’s lifestyle with a veterinary professional before proceeding. Minimum age of 16 weeks.

Price: $36

h3n8 canine influenza

This vaccine provides comprehensive coverage against the Canine Influenza Virus H3N8.

Canine Influenza Virus is a highly contagious respiratory infection commonly seen in socially active dogs. Outbreaks are commonly seen in situations where dogs are in close contact, such as shelters, kennels, dog day care facilities, and grooming or boarding facilities.The first outbreak of H3N8 was in 2004, and has since been seen all over the US. The first positive case of H3N2 was in March, 2015 in Chicago and has spread to a number of other areas throughout the US. Both strains are still being diagnosed around the country, and all dogs are at risk. Symptoms include red and/or runny eyes, fever, sneezing, nasal discharge, dry, persistent cough, drastic weight loss, physical discomfort.

Recommended protocol:
Two doses are required 3-4 weeks apart, and can begin as early as 8 weeks of age. An annual booster vaccination may be given for life, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

Recommended lifestyle:
This disease is most common in densely populated canine communities and amongst dogs that are constantly in public places. Speak with a veterinary professional before deciding if this vaccine is appropriate for your dog. Minimum age of 8 weeks.

Price: $36

Canine Influenza pack (H3N8 and H3N2)

This vaccine pack provides comprehensive coverage against two strains of the Canine Influenza Virus – H3N8 and H3N2.

Canine Influenza Virus is a highly contagious respiratory infection commonly seen in socially active dogs. Outbreaks are commonly seen in situations where dogs are in close contact, such as shelters, kennels, dog day care facilities, and grooming or boarding facilities.The first outbreak of H3N8 was in 2004, and has since been seen all over the US. The first positive case of H3N2 was in March, 2015 in Chicago and has spread to a number of other areas throughout the US. Both strains are still being diagnosed around the country, and all dogs are at risk. Symptoms include red and/or runny eyes, fever, sneezing, nasal discharge, dry, persistent cough, drastic weight loss, physical discomfort.

Recommended protocol:
Two doses are required 3-4 weeks apart, and can begin as early as 8 weeks of age. An annual booster vaccination may be given for life, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

Recommended lifestyle:
This disease is most common in densely populated canine communities and amongst dogs that are constantly in public places. Speak with a veterinary professional before deciding if this vaccine is appropriate for your dog. Minimum age of 8 weeks.

Price: $39

Feline: Individual Vaccines

Vaccine

Disease & Detection

Recommendation & Pricing

PUREVAX RABIES

The standard rabies vaccine is effective at preventing rabies virus infection in both dogs and cats. This vaccine has been in existence for many years and is still used in many places for the prevention of rabies in cats. However, while this vaccine has shown very little propensity for causing adverse medical reactions in dogs, there is ample evidence that it can cause cancerous tumors in cats (fibrosarcomas). The chance of a tumor occurring at the injection site is rare, but if it does happen, the prognosis is very poor. Cats that develop these tumors face almost 100% mortality, or may have a limb amputated to avoid spread of the tumor.

Starting in 2010, VIP Petcare started offering the PureVax Feline Rabies vaccine, developed by Merial. This vaccine is non-adjuvanted, meaning it contains less of the various agents believed to cause fibrosarcomas in cats. The PureVax rabies is specifically formulated for cats and has become the standard of care amongst our many veterinary partners. The short term drawback to this vaccine is that it currently is only labeled for one-year use, while the canine vaccine may be given every three years. It is also much more complicated to manufacture, leading to a higher price for pet owners.

The VIP Petcare Medical Board has determined that this vaccine represents the “best medicine” for cats and as such, VIP Petcare will only make this vaccine available for the prevention of rabies in our feline clients. If you would like more information about this issue, please contact us at 1.800.427.7973 or helpdesk@vippetcare.com.

Rabies is a viral infection of the central nervous system that can affect all mammals, including humans, and is 100% fatal if left untreated. It is transmitted from animal-to-animal or from animal-to-human primarily through the bite of an infected animal. Rabies virus travels in the nerves from the site of the bite to the brain and spinal cord. Rabies is ever present in the U.S. in wild animals such as skunks, raccoons, and bats.

Rabid animals undergo personality changes during the course of the disease; these changes may include aggression and biting or, conversely, increased friendliness and affectionateness. Other symptoms may include fever, seizures, paralysis, hydrophobia (fear of water), lack of coordination, excessive excitability, and excessive salivation or foaming at the mouth. Once clinical signs of rabies appear, treatment is not effective and the disease is fatal.

If your pet shows any of the common symptoms of rabies as described above, get them to a full-service veterinary facility immediately. If treatment is not pursued immediately, the prognosis for most pets is very poor.

Recommended protocol:
Vaccination of kittens should begin at the minimum age as determined by each state. An annual booster vaccination should be given for life. This vaccine is only labeled for one-year efficacy, unlike the canine rabies.

Recommended lifestyle:
All cats 12-16 weeks (minimum age for rabies is determined by state law, varies throughout the U.S.).

Price: $35

3-IN-1 (FVRCP)
3-in-1 is also known as ‘FVRCP’ vaccine – protection against:
• Feline Herpesvirus (Causes Feline Infectious Rhinotracheitis)
• Feline Calicivirus (Causes Feline Influenza)
• Feline Panleukopenia Virus (Causes Feline Distemper)

Feline Panleukopenia Virus (AKA Feline Distemper)
Feline Panleukopenia Virus (causative agent of Feline Distemper) is a widespread and highly contagious viral disease that causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, immune suppression, anemia and death. The virus affects mostly young cats, although cats of any age may be infected. This disease can be fatal in cats of all age groups. Feline Panleukopenia virus does not affect humans or dogs.

Feline Herpesvirus and Feline Calicivirus
Feline Herpesvirus (causative agent of Feline Infectious Rhinotracheitis) and Feline Calicivirus (causative agent of Feline Influenza) are two of the three feline respiratory infections against which the feline 3-in-1 vaccine protects. The clinical signs of these diseases may include runny eyes, runny nose, ulcers of mouth and tongue, coughing, sneezing, fever, pneumonia, loss of appetite, and inactivity. Secondary bacterial infections can be fatal. Infected cats may harbor the organism for life with persistent or recurrent disease.

These diseases are common and are extremely contagious from cat to cat via infected discharges (e.g. mucus) and infected secretions (e.g. saliva and tears). These diseases do not affect humans or dogs.

Recommended protocol:
Vaccination of kittens should begin at eight weeks of age and be repeated every three to four weeks until 16 weeks of age. An annual booster vaccination should be given for life, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

Recommended Lifestyle:
All cats. Minimum age 8 weeks.

Price: $36

FELINE LEUKEMIA (FeLV)

FeLV/FIV Blood Test
The FeLV/FIV test is a simple blood test that detects the presence of both Feline Leukemia Virus and/or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in cats. A VIP Petcare representative will draw a small amount of blood from your cat and it will be submitted to a national laboratory for testing. Clients will be informed of the test results the week following the blood draw.

If a kitten is under 16 weeks of age and tests positive for FeLV, a re-test is recommended 3-4 weeks later due to the increased risk of a false positive result in young kittens. Kittens who have a mother who is FeLV positive will occasionally receive a FALSE POSITIVE result for FeLV due to exposure; however, a mother who is FeLV positive does not necessarily mean the kittens will be positive. Some can clear the infection and test negative weeks later due to developed immunity.

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is transmitted from cat to cat via saliva and nasal mucus. It is also commonly transmitted directly from an infected mother to her kittens. Cats in direct contact with one another are the most likely to transmit the disease. This virus suppresses a cat’s immune system much like AIDS disease does in humans.

The signs of FeLV are therefore varied and often reflect secondary diseases that develop due to the FeLV-infected cat’s compromised immune system. The most common signs are fever, anemia, appetite loss, and inactivity. Treatment of the disease may help for a while, but it is eventually fatal.
FeLV does not affect people or dogs.

The disease can affect cats of any age but is especially common in the young and the old. Approximately 1 or 2 cats out of any 100 visibly healthy cats have the feline leukemia virus.

Approximately 99% of cats who carry the virus in their bloodstream will die within 5 years of contracting the virus. (Approximately 50% succumb within 6 months.) In other words, a cat with FeLV may appear normal and be contagious to other cats for up to five years after contracting the virus.

Recommended protocol:
Vaccination of kittens should begin at 9-12 weeks-of-age with a booster vaccine administered 3-4 weeks later. An annual booster vaccination should be given for life, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

Recommended lifestyle:
If a cat will, or might have any direct contact whatsoever with outside cats (even just sharing food or water bowls or the occasional escape), the cat should be vaccinated annually against feline leukemia. VIP Petcare recommends that every cat be vaccinated at least once in its lifetime for FeLV, even if they are an indoor cat in a single-cat household. Indoor cats can escape or have direct contact with outdoor cats through window screens. Minimum age 9 weeks.

Price: Vaccination: $36

Additional Services

Service

Benefits

Recommendation & Pricing

PET MICROCHIP ID

Microchips are small, permanent identification chips that are about the size of a grain of rice. They are injected between the shoulder blades with a needle, and the process is about as quick as a vaccination. Most pets go through the one-time process without so much as a squeak. The estimated cost to implant and register a microchip ranges from about $25 to $75. However, VIP Petcare charges only $18, with free lifetime registration with a national database.

VIP Petcare microchips are internationally recognized and meet ISO requirements (International Organization for Standardization). This promotes compatibility between chips and scanners. VIP Petcare uses universal scanners, which read multiple microchip frequencies sold by different microchip manufacturers.

Your pet’s microchip ID code, just like your pet, is one of a kind. When your lost pet is taken to an animal shelter or veterinary clinic, they will scan your pet for a microchip and read its unique code. This code is stored with your pet’s profile and linked to your contact information.

Registration and keeping your contact information updated is just as important as microchipping. VIP Petcare automatically registers every recorded and implanted microchip into the found.org database within 5 days. Found Animals Microchip Registry is a free, national, nonprofit database that was conceived in support of a single belief: all lost pets need to find their way home.

Identification tags can become lost easily, and tattoos may not always be legible. Only about 15% of dogs and 2% of cats without permanent identification return home to their owners. Approximately 9 million companion animals are admitted to shelters in the U.S. every year. Many of these are euthanized because their owners cannot be found.

Only a pet microchip can offer a truly permanent identification. Hundreds of thousands of pets have returned home thanks to a microchip.

The American Veterinary Medical Association, the American Animal Hospital Association and the Humane Society of the United States all recommend microchipping. Microchip Pet IDs are not available in Florida at this time.

Price: $18

PARVO/DISTEMPER TITER TEST
As a replacement or supplement to regular vaccination against these infectious diseases, VIP Petcare offers blood tests that will check your pet’s titer level, or relative level of immunity to Parvovirus and Canine Distemper. The results of this test can be difficult to read or draw clear conclusions from, so consult a veterinary professional with the test results before deciding whether or not to vaccinate your pet.

Parvovirus is a highly contagious and potentially fatal disease of puppies and unvaccinated adult dogs. This virus is transmitted by direct contact with infected dogs or wild members of the dog family, infected feces, or a contaminated environment. Canine parvovirus can live for months to years in the environment. Canine parvovirus causes fever, severe vomiting, diarrhea (often -but not always- containing blood), and dehydration in dogs. The disease is often fatal. The virus is especially lethal to young dogs. It is transmitted by contact with parvovirus-infected dog feces or with an object which has come into contact with infected dog feces.

The virus may be brought into a home on a person’s hand, clothes, or shoes. Therefore, even a strictly indoor dog with no direct contact with other dogs, should be vaccinated against parvovirus. This disease does not affect people or cats.

NOTE: Certain breeds of dogs are especially susceptible to parvovirus infection. These breeds include rottweilers, doberman pinschers, pit bull breeds, and German shepherds. We recommend that puppies of such breeds be given an extra parvovirus vaccination at 20 – 22 weeks-of-age. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds who are to be boarded at a kennel may benefit from an additional parvovirus vaccination just prior (a few days to a few weeks) to boarding. Individual dogs of highly susceptible breeds that go to dog shows, dog classes, dog parks, or visit any location which dogs have frequented may benefit from receiving a parvovirus vaccination every six months rather than just annually.

Recommended protocol:
Vaccination of puppies should begin at 8 weeks of age and be repeated every 3 to 4 weeks until 16 weeks of age. Dogs over 4 months old will require only 1 booster vaccination 3-4 weeks after the initial vaccine. An annual booster vaccination should be given for life, or as recommended by your veterinarian.

Recommended Lifestyle:
All cats. Minimum age 8 weeks.

Price: $65

ROUNDWORM DEWORMER
Roundworm may be detected, treated, and prevented by VIP Petcare.
Throughout much of the U.S., roundworms and tapeworms (flatworms) are far and away the most common intestinal parasites of our pets. These worms can cause a variety of problems including diarrhea, poor coat health, and general failure to thrive. In puppies and kittens roundworm infestation is the most common cause of the pot-bellied appearance. Severe infestation can lead to liver, lung, and brain damage. Roundworms are not only contagious for other pets, but also for humans, especially children via contact with pet feces. The migrating larvae in children can cause serious and tragic disease especially of the eye and brain. Rarely, a puppy or kitten will vomit or pass in his stool an entire adult roundworm. It is approximately 2″ – 10″ long, white, and may look like a piece of spaghetti. Although adult roundworms mainly infest only puppies and kittens, mature dogs and cats can also harbor the parasite in their intestines.

The most common source of puppy roundworms are roundworm larvae (immature roundworms) which are resting and causing no trouble in the wall of the mother’s uterus. These larvae migrate into the fetal pups during pregnancy. The larvae then mature in the young pup and start laying eggs when the puppy is about three weeks of age. From that time on, the affected puppy’s feces contain eggs and can transmit roundworms to other dogs as well as re-infecting itself.

There is a similar roundworm cycle in the cat, but with an important difference. Instead of larvae going from mother cat to kitten in the womb, the transfer takes place in the milk during nursing. Cat roundworm larvae can live in the mother cat’s breast tissue until nursing stimulates the larvae to enter the milk, transferring them into the suckling kitten.

Price: $24

TAPEWORM DEWORMER
Tapeworm may be treated at VIP Petcare clinics with injectable Praziquantel for dogs and cats. A phone or web order may also be placed for Drontal Tabs for dogs, or Profender Tapeworm Deworming for cats to treat at home. To order an at-home treatment, your pet must have been seen at a VIP Petcare clinic within the past twelve months. Prevention of tapeworm is only possible through the regular use of a flea preventative product, as fleas carry and spread tapeworm infections.

Tapeworms can cause a variety of problems including diarrhea, coat changes, and failure to thrive. They are more common in adult pets than in puppies and kittens, but are present in all areas of the U.S. and can be contracted by all mammals. The most common variety is transmitted by fleas. Tapeworm can be transmitted to humans through direct contact with tapeworm-infected pets and their feces.

The tapeworm in the intestine breaks off its rear segments periodically, and they appear in the feces of an infested pet. The segments are white, flat, and approximately ¼” – ½” long and resemble “moving cucumber seeds or grains of rice”. If you see these moving objects in a fresh stool or stuck to the hair of a pet’s rear end, then the pet likely has a tapeworm infestation and can move straight to treatment. When the moving segments crawl away, dry up, and crack, they release hundreds of microscopic tapeworm eggs. Neither the segments nor the eggs are infective to a pet or a human, but if a flea larva happens to be nearby, it may ingest one of these eggs. When the larva matures into an adult flea (with the tapeworm egg still inside) and is ingested by a pet during grooming, he/she will get the tapeworm. The key to preventing tapeworm infestation is flea control.

Price: from $29 (dosage based on weight)

RABIES FAVN TITER TEST

VIP Petcare offers blood tests that will check your pet’s titer level, or relative level of immunity to the rabies virus. The results of this test can be difficult to read or draw clear conclusions from, so consult a veterinary professional with the test results before deciding whether or not to vaccinate your pet.

If your pet shows any of the common symptoms of rabies as described above, get them to a full-service veterinary facility immediately. If treatment is not pursued immediately, the prognosis for most pets is very poor.

Rabies is a viral infection of the central nervous system that can affect all mammals, including humans, and is 100% fatal if left untreated. It is transmitted from animal-to-animal or from animal-to-human primarily through the bite of an infected animal. Rabies virus travels in the nerves from the site of the bite to the brain and spinal cord. Rabies is ever present in the U.S. in wild animals such as skunks, raccoons, and bats.

Rabid animals undergo personality changes during the course of the disease; these changes may include aggression and biting or, conversely, increased friendliness and affectionateness. Other symptoms may include fever, seizures, paralysis, hydrophobia (fear of water), lack of coordination, excessive excitability, and excessive salivation or foaming at the mouth. Once clinical signs of rabies appear, treatment is not effective and the disease is fatal.

Price: $255 (please call in advance for availability 1.800.427.7973)

physical exam

A physical exam consists of an overall assessment and health wellness check based on your pet’s current body condition. The Veterinarian will check your pet’s vital signs such as heart rate, breathing, ears, eyes, teeth, weight, discuss your pet’s diet and nutrition, current flea and heartworm preventatives your pet is on, and answer any other questions.

By doing a physical exam, you can diagnose and treat minor health issues with your pet before they become more serious. This is also a good time to address and health concerns you have about your pet.
VIP Petcare recommends getting a physical exam annually.

Price: $45

Physical Exam + Health Certificate (Domestic)

A physical exam consists of an overall assessment and health wellness check based on your pet’s current body condition, vaccination history and current medications. The Veterinarian will assess if your pet is healthy enough for travel within the US.

For domestic air travel, state health officials generally require health certificates for all animals. Health certificates must be issued by a licensed veterinarian who examines the pet within 10 days of departure. For dogs and cats, airlines generally require health certificates at check-in.
VIP Petcare recommends getting a health certificate as needed for travel.

Price: $75
(please call in advance for availability 1.800.427.7973)

Physical Exam + Health Certificate (International)

A physical exam consists of an overall assessment and health wellness check based on your pet’s current body condition, vaccination history and current medications. The Veterinarian will research what is required by the destination country. Certain countries have very specific requirements that might take more time and research to meet all the qualification to enter. The Veterinarian will assess if your pet is healthy enough and meet all the requirements for international travel.

For international air travel, different countries have different requirements before entering. An international health certificate can be one of many requirements for international travel. Some countries require blood tests at least 6 months before departure to prove that your pet is vaccinated against rabies. The Veterinarian will be able to create a checklist of everything that is required by the desired country.

Warning: If the destination country’s requirements are not met, your pet may be detained or quarantined upon arrival.

VIP Petcare recommends getting an international health certificate as needed for travel.

Price: $200
(please call in advance for availability 1.800.427.7973)

senior profile screen

The Senior Profile Screen consists of using blood, urine and fecal testing to help diagnose disease or pinpoint injury in pets over seven years old. The senior profile screen includes: complete blood count, urinalysis, thyroid testing, chemistry profile and a fecal test. This complete profile screen will help the vet assess your pet’s internal functions.

By doing the senior profile screen annually, the vet will be able to catch any issues with your pet’s internal functions. This information can be used for any future health issues and provides a baseline if your pet was healthy at the time of the test.
VIP Petcare recommends the senior profile screen annually to make sure your pet is healthy.

Price: $100

vetscreen, CBC
Blood testing is commonly used to help diagnose disease or pinpoint injury in pets. The Vetscreen, CBC, is a blood test that checks for inflammation, infections, dehydration and anemia. It also screens for kidney and liver dysfunctions. The CBC measures the quantity and quality of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets.
This screen provides a baseline of the pet’s normal values (assuming pet is healthy).

It is for both cats and dogs, of any age, to screen for internal medical problems. The veterinarian will combine the findings, your pets’ medical history, and other information to assess your pet’s health status and determine if additional testing or medications are recommended.

VIP Petcare recommends getting a Vetscreen, CBC annually to catch early health issues.

Price: $60

Heartworm/Lyme Combo Test
The Heartworm-Lyme Combo Test is a blood screening for Heartworm disease, Lyme disease, Ehrlichiosis, and Anaplasmosis. A VIP Petcare representative will draw a small amount of blood from your dog and submit it to a national laboratory the following week. You will receive your test results, as well as recommendations for follow up care (if needed) the week following the blood draw.
Heartworm disease can be prevented with a monthly heartworm prevention product, like Heartgard or Trifexis. While there is no full-proof method of preventing Lyme disease, Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis, these can be discouraged by keeping your pet on a regular anti-tick preventative.
VIP Petcare recommends getting your pet tested for Heartworm and Lyme annually.

Price: $31

fecal test intestinal parasite screening
Pet owners may submit a fecal sample to any VIP Petcare Community Veterinary Clinic. Please ensure that the sample is no older than 12 hours, if at all possible. The VIP Petcare fecal test will screen your pet for roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, giardia, and coccidia. In addition, the national laboratory that VIP Petcare partners with will also report any other irregular findings in the test that you can then discuss with your family veterinarian.
Microscopic examination of the stool does not always reveal tapeworm eggs. Veterinarians often must depend on the pet owner for a diagnosis of tapeworms (presence of white worm segments in feces or on the pet’s fur- will look like grains of rice).
All of the common bacterial or parasitic infections that will be discovered by the annual fecal test can be treated by VIP Petcare. A VIP Petcare representative will discuss your pet’s test results and treatment with you directly once results are received.

Price: $25

anal gland expression

An Anal Gland Expression is an internal expression (or emptying) of the glands inside the pet’s rectum if the pet is having issues. Many pets never seem to have a problem with their anal glands, however, if your pet’s anal glands fail to express properly while defecating, they may actually become impacted and make your pet very uncomfortable.

Some of the symptoms of anal discomfort include scooting, licking or chewing near the rectum, the stools have become soft and mushy or a foul or “fishy” odor coming from your pet’s rear. Getting the anal glands emptied when these symptoms arise will help your pet feel more comfortable and minimize the risk of infection.
VIP Petcare recommends getting an anal gland expression if your pet is showing any symptoms of impacted anal glands.

Price: $20

FIV/FELINE LEUKEMIA TEST

A VIP Petcare representative will draw a small amount of blood from your cat and it will be submitted to a national laboratory for testing. Clients will be informed of the test results the week following the blood draw.

The FeLV/FIV test is a simple blood test that detects the presence of either Feline Leukemia Virus or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in cats.
This test can be a good way to screen your cat for more than one life-threatening disease at one time.

Price: $43

nail trim

For a variety of reasons, keeping your dog’s nails trimmed is important for their overall health. For dogs, we clip and dremel the nails to a smooth edge. For cats, we clip the nails as close to the quick as possible.

A good indication that your dog needs its nails trimmed is if you hear them click on the floor as they walk or they scratch you when they jump up to say hi. For cats, it time for a nail trim when they are getting their nails stuck on the furniture or scratches you when they jump on you.
VIP Petcare recommends that your pet receives a nail trim regularly.

Price: $20