Aftercare and Adverse Events

ABOUT CIV H3N8 ABOUT HEARTWORM DISEASE

If you think your pet may be experiencing a medical emergency call your veterinarian right away. Most dogs and cats experience no adverse events from vaccination. If your pet is showing any sign of an adverse event, do not panic.

These signs usually subside within 24-48 hours. Common minor symptoms may include achiness, lethargy, increased anxiety, appetite loss. More moderate symptoms include vomiting and/or diarrhea. Very rarely, a small lump may develop at the injection site. The lump typically dissipates on its own after a few weeks.

A very small percentage of cats and dogs develop symptoms. Very rarely, a vaccine associated adverse event results in hospitalization or death. Extreme allergic adverse events (anaphylaxis), although rare, occur shortly after vaccinating. If your pet is unresponsive or cannot breathe, they should be immediately taken to a veterinary emergency hospital.

If your pet has any of the following symptoms or signs, please contact us right away:

• Repeated episodes of vomiting and/or diarrhea
• Lethargic or restless behavior lasting more than 48 hours
• Swollen face
• Difficulty breathing
• Hives (bumps) on the body
• Lump at injection site which appears painful or drains

Please consult VIP Petcare’s advertised schedule – if you are still in our clinic, our on-site veterinarian will be able to give you further advice. You can also reach us at 800.427.7973 (7 days/week, 7am-4pm PST) to speak with someone regarding the best way to treat your pet.

IF YOU CANNOT RETURN TO ONE OF OUR CLINICS, CONTACT A LOCAL 24 HOUR EMERGENCY VETERINARY FACILITY.

Follow-ups

Please inform us of any vaccine-associated adverse event and follow-ups that may have occurred. If your pet has a history of vaccine-associated adverse events, please inform our technicians prior to vaccination. Arrive early so we may review your pet’s vaccination history. VIP Petcare is not financially responsible for veterinary fees that result from treating vaccine associated adverse events.

Fibrosarcoma

About one in 10,000-50,000 cats may develop a tumor (fibrosarcoma) at the site of injection. Fibrosarcoma are often inoperable and fatal. (The lump that may form within hours to a week after vaccination is not a fibrosarcoma). As with many kinds of cancer, reasons a fibrosarcoma develops are still being researched, but may include genetic predisposition of certain cats, as well as chronic inflammation from any type of injection. Research is ongoing, and we will update our protocols as well as our website as new information becomes available.